Sugar’s Transition From Nice To Nasty : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture : NPR

via Sugar’s Transition From Nice To Nasty : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture : NPR

This is an example of an “interpretive community” or a “paradigm.” Those things are not just individual interpretations but are large frameworks that in very subtle and almost invisible ways affect our thinking. Given enough persistence and longevity and they become ideology – what just feels “natural”. What this means, at least for me, is that there is no natural, only interpretation. Enjoy.

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Your Facts or Mine? – The New York Times

via Your Facts or Mine? – The New York Times

Again, if you read Stanley Fish, this would not surprise you. If you want to see your high school learning in action, just follow the election campaign. Both candidates are arguing for the ability to determine what he facts are. And while this can appear messy and often frustrating, it is actually what happens in all areas of knowledge. Think about it: what did Shakespeare write or not write? what constitutes a planet? what is considered healthy to eat these days? All of these are argument about interpretation in order to be able to say what the facts are afterwards.To paraphrase our Nobel Laureate , “the facts they are a’changing”.

How Much Graduates Earn Drives More College Rankings – The New York Times

via How Much Graduates Earn Drives More College Rankings – The New York Times

If you wanted an example of what Stanley Fish was talking about when he said that interpretations are arguments about what “facts” can then be said to be there, this article is for you. It is a report on the ongoing arguments about what college is worth – this time in real dollars and cents. All of the different reports in the article are arguing precisely about the “facts”. And this time around, it is not something “soft” like literature, rather it is about how you might decide your future.

Tech hindering learning.

via High-Level Multitasking Is A Myth : Shots – Health News : NPR

or this one:

Multitasking, social media and distraction: Research review

or this one:

http://www.pnas.org/content/106/37/15583

I know you are tired of me saying it but if you want long-term intellect (ie, success getting into and at college) then you have to give up the phone some of the time. In some ways it is the same question that comes out of Gilbert’s book: why do we fail to apply new insights/make changes when we know how we are doing something is largely ineffective?