Inconstant Constants

This is what it looks like when experts disagree,¬†or perhaps this is what it looks like when standing on the cusp of a paradigm shift. Bear in mind that this is no small disagreement, the argument is over what the facts are – maybe a given constant in physics isn’t so constant. But for us what is more intriguing is the question as to what the new knowledge will look like and what it means for how we will do things – or as is suggested in the article, we are about to “learn new physics.”

via Cosmos Controversy: The Universe Is Expanding, but How Fast? – The New York Times

Cultural Lineage

When Davis talks about the “cultural lineage” we are inheriting, I think of this kind of example – how a song, an artwork, became significant for constructions of race and gender. This little piece I think is like the beginning of ToK thinking. Listen to the included samples loud enough and you will see your parents dance.

via ‘Respect’ Wasn’t A Feminist Anthem Until Aretha Franklin Made It One : NPR

Death, the West, and the Gita

via Have Your Wishes For Care Known Before A Health Crisis Strikes : Shots – Health News : NPR

Given our recent readings and discussions in the Gita I found this to be an interesting look at the way we currently think about and treat those close to death in our culture. We have discussed the role of dualism in Western thought and this seems like one of the consequences of a dualist way of thinking about death. What I wonder is if the thoughts expressed towards the end of this article are beginning to take on thinking that is similar to what Krishna expresses in the Gita.

And then there is the notion that any day you think about death – and by extension the life you have now – is a good day. Enjoy.

Death and Food

via In Many Species, a Family Dinner Means Something Else – The New York Times

As we move into the realm of other perspectives and other cultures, this seemed fairly timely. Here is a rather interesting and detailed look at cannibalism in both the non-human and the human world. It’a a fascinating read, the pictures are cool, and it ends with recipes.

Well, not really, but it does hint at other ways of thinking about the corporeal world we inhabit. Best if read right before dinner.