hmmm…interesting…?

This looks intriguing:

http://www.npr.org/2017/09/29/554271617/-blade-runner-2049-even-sharper-than-the-original

or

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/sep/29/blade-runner-2049-review-ryan-gosling-harrison-ford-denis-villeneuve

I wonder …. ?

 

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Kind of important message

I forgot to tell the A-day kids this so if you know of any, please pass this along to them.

I have jury duty on Tues, Sept 12, so I will be doing my civic duty downtown. You will be in class and you will have an EE workday. Bring materials, bring headphones, bring what is necessary to have a quiet, productive day. I am counting on you. Thanks.

And B-day kids, I will be out on Fri, Sept 15, as well (it’s a longer story), so the above will apply to you on Friday.

See everyone sometime next week. Thanks.

Smartphone = crack pipe?

via Are Teenagers Replacing Drugs With Smartphones? – The New York Times

You could read this as “See Mr Whiteside, at least I’m not doing drugs”

OR

“I am hooked, and I don’t even know on what – just whatever this device pushes on me.”

It does make me think about Marx’s line: “Religion is the opiate of the masses” and how completely he underestimated technology.

These are a few of my favorite things

I love life. Look at this – issues of neuroscience, knowledge, knowing, self-identity. AND David Byrne!?!?!?!! Are you kidding me? Who put this together? This is ToK as it should be – weirdo musicians and ways of knowing.

The experiments look fascinating and I love the interdisciplinary thinking that Byrne is using, not unlike his band’s interdisciplinary sound (Talking Heads for those of you not in the know). Look at all the things a ToK experience can prep you for – it’s like being an explorer, just of the mind.

via David Byrne’s Theatrical Thought Experiment in Silicon Valley | The Do List | KQED Arts

Death, the West, and the Gita

via Have Your Wishes For Care Known Before A Health Crisis Strikes : Shots – Health News : NPR

Given our recent readings and discussions in the Gita I found this to be an interesting look at the way we currently think about and treat those close to death in our culture. We have discussed the role of dualism in Western thought and this seems like one of the consequences of a dualist way of thinking about death. What I wonder is if the thoughts expressed towards the end of this article are beginning to take on thinking that is similar to what Krishna expresses in the Gita.

And then there is the notion that any day you think about death – and by extension the life you have now – is a good day. Enjoy.